Summer Reading 2018

Reading is essential for strong academic performance and improves students’ comprehension skills, analytical skills, vocabulary, and overall achievement across the curriculum. Although our students read regularly during the school year, they frequently experience learning loss during the summer months.  Wilson Hall’s summer reading program helps ensure that our students maintain their reading skills.

Each student in middle and high school will read at least two novels this summer.  Honors courses require three novels.  Students should complete all novels prior to the beginning of school in August.  Students are encouraged to make notes during or after reading their novels in order to assist with comprehension and recollection.  Suggested outlines for middle and high school notes are attached.

Students in 6-12 will be assessed on their novels on the first full day of school, Thursday, August 23, 2018, and  should bring their books to class the first few weeks of school.

Rising Fifth Grade Summer Reading
George Washington’s Socks  by Elvira Woodruff
The Castle in the Attic by Elizabeth Winthrop
– Students are responsible for acquiring these books.  They are available at most bookstores or Amazon.com, and your child will need a copy that can be written in or highlighted for use in class.
– There will be a test on each book when school resumes in August.  There will be reviews in class before each test.
– It may help your child to take notes on the books as he/she reads them. It is suggested that students make a list of the characters and write down things they do. It is also a good idea to write a couple of sentences that tell what each chapter is about.  The notes can be organized in a spiral notebook.

Middle School Summer Reading 

Rising Sixth Grade   (TWO books)
Mandatory: Gifted Hands: The Ben Carson Story (Kids’ Edition) by Gregg Lewis and Deborah S. Lewis
Choice (choose one):
Finding Someplace by Denise Lewis Patrick
Fish in a Tree by Lynda Mullaly Hunt
Pay It Forward (Young Readers’ Edition) by Catherine Ryan Hyde
Swindle by Gordon Korman

Rising Seventh Grade   (TWO books)
Mandatory: The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne
Choice (choose one):
The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman
Scat by Carl Hiaasen
Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech

Rising Eighth Grade   (TWO books)
Mandatory: The Pearl by John Steinbeck
Choice (choose one):
A Long Way from Chicago by Richard Peck
Schooled by Gordon Korman
Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli

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High School Summer Reading 

English I CP   (TWO books)
Mandatory:
The Giver by Lois Lowry
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

English I Honors   (THREE books)
Mandatory:
The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch
The Once and Future King by T.H. White
Read the first THREE sections called The Sword in the  Stone, The Queen of Air and Darkness, and The Ill-Made Knight. Section four will be read during school.
Choice: Read any age-appropriate book that interests you.  For inspiration, consider recommendations from family or friends, the best seller list, a topic that you would like to explore, or a favorite author.  Choose a work YOU will enjoy reading!

English II CP   (TWO books)
Mandatory: The Once and Future King by T.H. White
Read the third section called The Ill-Made Knight; section four will be read during school.
Choice (choose one):
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold

English II Honors   (THREE books)
Mandatory:
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
Choice: Read any age-appropriate book that interests you.  For inspiration, consider recommendations from family or friends, the best seller list, a topic that you would like to explore, or a favorite author.  Choose a work YOU will enjoy reading!

English III CP   (TWO books)
Mandatory: Unbroken (The Young Adult Adaptation) by Laura Hillenbrand
Choice (choose one):
Good Call: Reflections on Faith, Family, and Fowl by Jase Robertson
Live Fearless by Sadie Robertson

A.P. English Language   (THREE books)
Mandatory: God Never Blinks by Regina Brett
Choice (choose one):
Chew on This by Eric Schlosser and Charles Wilson
Freakonomics by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner
V for Vendetta by Alan Moore
Choice:  Read any age-appropriate book that interests you.  For inspiration, consider recommendations from family or friends, the best seller list, a topic that you would like to explore, or a favorite author.  Choose a work YOU will enjoy reading!

English IV CP   (TWO books)
Mandatory: Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
Choice: Read any age-appropriate book that interests you.  For inspiration, consider recommendations from family or friends, the best seller list, a topic that you would like to explore, or a favorite author.  Choose a work YOU will enjoy reading!
Because seniors taking AP English Language already have selected a choice book, they do not have to select another choice book for English IV.

A.P. English Literature   (THREE books)
Mandatory: The Stranger by Albert Camus
Choice (choose one):
All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr
Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier
East of Eden by John Steinbeck
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
Choice: Read any age-appropriate book that interests you.  For inspiration, consider recommendations from family or friends, the best seller list, a topic that you would like to explore, or a favorite author.  Choose a work YOU will enjoy reading! 

Middle School Summer Reading Study Guide 

The notes will not be graded but should be completed and brought to class during the first week of school. 

Title
Author’s Name
Publication Year
Genre
Point of View
Setting (time and place)
List of characters with a brief description and list of traits for each (direct and indirect characterization
Conflicts (internal and external)
Plot summary of entire book
Themes (main ideas or messages – include at least one quote to support each theme): Examples of themes include the triumph of good over evil, strength in family, the value of friendship, the importance of acceptance, etc.

High School Summer Reading Study Guide
The notes will not be graded but should be completed and brought to class during the first week of school.

Title
Author’s Name
Publication Year
Genre
Author’s Biographical Information
Setting (time and place of literary work)historical context – when
geographical context – where
physical context – weather, time of day, etc.
Point of View (relationship between the storyteller/speaker and the story)
first person – narrator is one of the characters and is involved in the events (can be reliable or unreliable)
third person limited – told by narrator from the viewpoint of a character (you know the thoughts and feelings of only one character)
third person omniscient – told by an all-knowing narrator (you know the thoughts and feelings of all characters)
Plot (for fiction books)
exposition – introduces characters and setting
narrative hook – the point which establishes the basic conflict
rising action – the conflict is developed
climax – the way in which the central conflict will be solved
falling action – reveals the outcome of the climax
resolution – brings the story to a logical and satisfying conclusion
Conflicts
internal – conflict in a character’s own mind (man vs. self)
external – conflict between character and an outside force (man vs. man, man vs. nature, or man vs. society)
Characters
round vs. flat and dynamic vs. static
round – character is well-developed with complex personality traits and is closely involved in the story
flat – barely developed character with one or few traits
dynamic – character grows or changes in a significant way
static – character remains unchanged by events or other characters
Characterization
direct – author makes direct statements about a character’s personality
indirect – author reveals the character through thoughts, words, actions, etc.
Themes
The central idea or message, the insight about life and the human experience that an author expresses in a work
Symbols
A person, object, action, place, or event that, in addition to its literal meaning, suggests a more complex meaning
Irony
contrast between appearance and reality
situational – incongruity between expected and actual outcomes
verbal – speaker says something contradictory to what he intends
dramatic – occurs when the audience knows something a character does not know
Writing Style
the way a writer selects and arranges words, sentences, and paragraphs
diction or word choice
syntax, sentence length, and structure
imagery
Tone and Mood
tone – the attitude of the author toward the subject (playful, humorous, serious, satirical, bitter, ironic, etc.)
mood – the atmosphere or feeling the reader gets
Figurative Language
list examples of devices such as similes, metaphors, alliteration, imagery, hyperbole, etc.